Men in the Off Hours Read & Download ☆ 104

Read & Download Men in the Off Hours

Men in the Off Hours Read & Download ☆ 104 ´ Anne Carson has been acclaimed by her peers as the most imaginative poet writing today In a recent profile The New York Times Magazine paid tribute to her amazing ability to combine the classical and the modern the mundane and the surreal in a body of work that is sure to endureIn Men in the Anne Carson has been acclaimed by her peers as the most imaginative poet writing today In a recent profile The New York Times Magazine paid tribute to her amazing ability to combine the classical and the modern the mundane and the surreal in a body of work that is sure to. me reading anne carson be like go girl ur rly giving us something idk what but it’s something

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Edward Hopper paintings illuminated by St Augustine And in a final prose poem she meditates movingly on the recent death of her mother With its uiet acute spirituality and its fearless wit and sensuality Men in the Off Hours shows us a fiercely individual poet at her bes. “As tree shapes from mist Her young death Loose In you”I’m tired of trying to review Carson’s work It’s just too beautiful

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Men in the Off HoursEndureIn Men in the Off Hours Carson offers further proof of her tantalizing gifts Reinventing figures as diverse as Oedipus Emily Dickinson and Audubon Carson sets up startling juxtapositions Lazarus among video paraphernalia Virginia Woolf and Thucydides discussing war. Canadian classicist Anne Carson shares the High Modernist attraction to the ancient worlds of Greece and Rome but with an inimitable style some might deride as post modern or even pastiche But what does post modern mean anyway As for pastiche some will remember the same charge was leveled against THE WASTE LAND Carson's work seems the obvious product of an era that exists only in small fragments as do Sappho's poems which Carson translated in IF NOT WINTER 2002 or timelessness That same great continuum in which Pound and Eliot read and wrote their masterpieces differs only in its expansion and even greater multiplicity of forms in GLASS IRONY AND GOD for example among the chief treats are the abandoned TV scripts Carson wroteThe classical inheritance behind the work that introduced Carson to most American readers EROS THE BITTERSWEET Princeton University Press became material for her own poems When I first wrote this reviews in 2000 I stated that Carson seemed to be channeling Sappho not knowing that IF NOT WINTER was on the horizon but I also mentioned the other characters populating MEN IN THE OFF HOURS Emily Dickinson Virginia Woolf Socrates Freud Catullus Edward Hopper St Augustine Tolstoy and Longinus Yet if Carson has moved from scholarship solely to the larger and less confined realm of poetry which she has done much to enlarge and re invent in terms of definition her primary subject hasn't changed from EROS THE BITTERSWEET the eternal conflict between men and women That conflict’s central fury lies in what Carson perceives as the former’s cold flat and harshly restrictive objectification of the latter Carson is not only a classicist but also an inventor restlessly seeking new shapes with each book as readers of her most recent book NOX know some may still be clumsily unwrapping the packaging itself a sort of pun on the difficulty of getting at poems Carson is always hyper conscious of presentation in fact the TV Men seuences MEN IN THE OFF HOURS contain are a perfect embodiment of her subject matter ”Lazarus is an imitation of Christ“ says one of her speakers ”As TV is an imitation ofLazarus As you and I are an imitation of TV“Is this the newest incarnation of life imitates art Or has it been decided that art imitates life is a truer take on how we live given our increasing reliance on media instead of direct experience Or in fact to continue with uestions to which I have no answers how much of daily life can said to be unbuffered against a world some see as now twice removed from reality What so real as the cry of a child A rabbit's cry may be wilder But it has no soul wrote Sylvia Plath or Lady Lazarus herselfrevised and expanded from a 2000 review originally published in the NASHVILLE SCENE; Dinitia Smith also provides an excellent commentary published close to the original publication of MEN IN THE OFF HOURS in that same year